Educator

As a gifted and passionate educator, Shana has taught and developed curricula for over 10,000 students in elementary education, for teens, adults and professionals. Her workshops inspire confidence in creative expression, joy in collaboration, and a passion for theater, movement, and artful communication.

Residencies in Higher Education

Her presence in the classroom set a perfect example for what she was asking of the students and as a result, the commitment level and depth of the class grew exponentially.”–Rose Beauchamp, Lecturer and Director of Dance, University of Virginia

Shana showed me how to have a two way conversation with myself, and allowed me to get to know myself better through acting and dancing…Shana always kept things playful and energetic which created an amazing environment in which I, as an artist, could create and, as an student, I could learn.” –Justin Pax
, Student, Department of Theater, University of Virginia

dance-class-sky-light

Viewpoints for Actors: Viewpoints is a movement-based language for theatrical composition, directing and performance. Through improvisation and theory, the performer develops awareness of oneself in relationship to others and to the theatrical space. This awareness provides greater choice and expressive possibilities. For the acting student, the entire realm of kinesthesia, time and space are opened up as sources of inspiration, emotion and action.

Integrated Production: Engaging the Language of the Theater
In this workshop we discuss the language of theater from an expanded perspective. Whether it’s the blue radiance of a special light, a swift, angular movement, text spoken gently, or a bright yellow towel hanging upstage right—each element of theater has a unique quality of expression. Discussing the various elements of theater, students explore how each can be used to communicate powerfully and most effectively.

Integrated Performance: Acting for Dancers
Movement is never devoid of content—emotion, story, image, thought and intention are inherent in every fiber of our bodies and in every physical expression. Developing awareness of this inner content and the facility to express it through the body, voice and text, gives the performance student greater power and choice.

Using techniques of physical theater and acting, this course aims to bring the dancer closer to the emotional content of his or her work. In addition, sound and text are introduced as integrated, embodied form of expression. In this way, students explore what it means to be an integrated performer.

Elementary Educational Outreach

She had a rare ability to bring students to a new level of dance and movement, inspiring them to express feelings, characters, and situations, all in a context that was appealing to both boys and girls – young and old!
–Jan May, Director of Arts, Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies

Shana’s enthusiasm and knowledge for the arts is contagious and felt by all the students. The student were fully engaged in all the activities and can’t wait for her to return again. I would highly recommend this workshop to other schools and can’t wait to sigh up for next year.” –Kimberly Zurlene, Music Specialist, Sanchez Elementary School

BCSIS2Through Boulder Ballet’s Outreach Program, Shana has taught over 10,000 students at economically disadvantaged schools throughout Colorado. She is the Outreach Coordinator and Educator, responsible for curriculum development from kindergarten through fifth grade.

The workshop uses games, music and play to foster joy and confidence in  creative expression through dance and theatrical movement.

BBBoulder Ballet School

At the Boulder Ballet School, Shana teaches Physical Theater to ballet students. Her unique focus develops presence, character, intention, and emotional vitality in these skilled dancers.

Shana’s classes are really fun and I always looked forward to going. She had us do really interesting and creative stuff and it helped me not feel so self-conscious about acting. She is also a really nice teacher and funny too.” –L. Baylin, 12 years old